Where ya gonna eat your Food Dat?

 

Terry’s Oysters

About Terry’s Oysters

Terry’s Oysters uses aquaculture practice in which Oysters are raised for human consumption. Oyster farming most likely developed in tandem with pearl farming, a similar practice in which oysters are farmed for the purpose of developing pearls. It was practiced by the ancient Romans as early as the 1st century BC on the Italian peninsula and later in Britain for export to Rome. The oyster industry has relied on aquacultured oysters since the late 18th century.

Terry’s Oysters has been a leader in this industry for many years.

Oysters naturally grow in estuarine bodies of brackish water. When farmed, the temperature and salinity of the water are controlled (or at least monitored), so as to induce spawning and fertilization, as well as to speed the rate of maturation – which can take several years.
Three methods of cultivation are commonly used. In each case oysters are cultivated to the size of “spat,” the point at which they attach themselves to a substrate. The substrate is known as a “cultch” (also spelled “cutch” or “culch”).The loose spat may be allowed to mature further to form “seed” oysters with small shells. In either case (spat or seed stage), they are then set out to mature. The maturation technique is where the cultivation method choice is made.
In one method the spat or seed oysters are distributed over existing oyster beds and left to mature naturally. Such oysters will then be collected using the methods for fishing wild oysters, such as dredging.In the second method the spat or seed may be put in racks, bags, or cages (or they may be glued in threes to vertical ropes) which are held above the bottom. Oysters cultivated in this manner may be harvested by lifting the bags or racks to the surface and removing mature oysters, or simply retrieving the larger oysters when the enclosure is exposed at low tide. The latter method may avoid losses to some predators, but is more expensive.

Details

Share

Location

Videos

How to Shuck An Oyster